News and Analysis (5/14/14)

One Egyptian is spared, …

… but an Egyptian-American’s letter from prison reveals the depth of the junta’s cruelty:

Hatred belongs in the public domain. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit Court says that while Pamela Geller may use terms disparaging other people, she can’t use the power of the state to prevent others from using them:

“The New York Police Department has no intention of scrapping a policy of recruiting Muslim arrestees and arrestees from Muslim countries as informants, visiting NYPD Commissioner William Bratton told The Jerusalem Post”:

As negotiators make another attempt to start a final draft on a nuclear accord …

… America prosecutes an Israeli for selling jet parts to Iran …

… and Iran boasts of a pending test flight for its replica of a downed U.S. drone …

… Saudi Arabia and Iran both signal desire to end the divisiveness that leaves the would-be regional leaders easy prey to their common enemies:

As the chair of governors at the “school at the centre of the ‘Trojan Horse’ allegations” expresses his shock at the poliferation of “false allegations”, …

… “with each reincarnation of a creeping Islamic threat, the gulf between the facts and what is reported widens. The following are some of the most popular examples – and the facts that discredit them”:

The shocking nature of Boko Haram’s most recent atrocity has put the little-understood terrorist group in the spotlight:

Proving they prefer autonomy to welfare, “Iraqi Kurdistan is risking the loss of its share of Iraq’s national budget to secure greater independence and the right to manage its own oil”:

Dakka claimed that rather than wait while his attorney finished parking his car, an impatient detective “lunged toward Dakka’s daughter to bring her inside the headquarters, and a melee started in which … police officers allegedly beat Dakka to the ground” and the called Dakka names “and uttered expletives”:

“[I]mplementation and timing of the reform remain in doubt, as does the nature of the system that will take its place. In one significant change it will become easier for foreigners to leave the country and change jobs. This and other reforms will have to be ratified by the shura (advisory) council”:

 

Leave a Reply